Saturday, June 1, 2013

Hairdresser

I love hair salons windows here. They are amazingly elegant, delicately designed, conveying the graceful feel of the job, prevailing in current fashion of window displaying, artful, luxurious, ornately crafted, graceful, offering the sense of majestic, and, most of all, paying attention to the last detail. I will give you an example from the following shop:
The thing that caught my attention is the sumptuous cloth used in the display, a very simple, indeed, display, obeying the rules of minimalistic design. Love at first sight:
Let us zoom in at the lonely candle, brilliantly placed in the middle (click on the photo to zoom in):
We discover
  1. Hair thrown all over, hair recently cut from human heads. What a brilliant idea to decorate the window with hair!
  2. A dead fly at the bottom left hand corner of the photo.
One wonders if these additions are done by mistake or if they were part of a design scheme, so let us turn the camera to other parts of the window. Look closely in the middle, between the hairstyling products, and you will see more hair:
Look at the sides of the window and you see even more hair:
And finally look at another part of the window to see a used bag of very fine Swedish snus bag.
No hairdressers in the world would have had the brilliant idea of decorating their windows with flies, snus and human hair, lots and lots of hair, hair everywhere. But in Sweden we love to be original! We offer decorations which are a pleasure to the eye and food for the soul and spirit. People think that hairdressers' prices are very high in Sweden. But they have to take into account that they pay both for great haircuts and for the design experience, the pleasure of being in a clean, artfully-decorated environment. The particular hairdresser charges 340 SEK (about 51 US dollars) for a simple haircut, but offers a generous discount for children and retired people: 320 SEK (48 US dollars), a whole 5% discount!

A friend of mine did not like the decoration, so she told the shop, Salong de Två, to change it. Again, they applied a minimalistic approach. Rather than getting rid of the hair, they took down a purple curtain and tossed it on top: